EDDIE NOACK

Born De Armand Noack, Jnr., 29 April 1930, Houston, Texas
Died 5 February 1978, Houston, Texas A.k.a. Tommy Wood.

Noack who gained degrees in English and Journalism at the University of Houston made his radio debut in 1947 and made his first record for the Gold Star label in 1949, "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes". In 1951, he cut several songs for Four Star including "Too Hot To Handle". Leased to the TNT label, it drew attention to his songwriting and was recorded by several artists, most recently by Deke Dickerson, who also included "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" on his new (excellent) CD, "Deke Dickerson In 3 Dimensions". Noack joined Starday in 1953 (beginning a long association with 'Pappy' Daily), where his immediate success came as a writer when several of his songs were recorded by top artists including Hank Snow who scored a # 5 country hit with "These Hands" in 1956. Noack moved with Daily to his D label where in 1958, after recording rockabilly tracks as Tommy Wood, he had a country hit with "Have Blues Will Travel" (# 14). During the '60s, Noack quit recording to concentrate on songwriting and publishing and had many of his songs including Flowers For Mama, Barbara Joy, The Poor Chinee, A Day In The Life Of A Fool and No Blues Is Good News successfully recorded by George Jones as album cuts. In 1968, Eddie recorded "Psycho" for the K-Ark label. This bizarre song, about a serial killer, was virtually unknown then since the original fifties version by its composer, Leon Payne (yes, the "I Love You Because" guy), had - understandably - never received any airplay. Since Eddie's version it has become a cult favourite, covered by, among others, Elvis Costello. Noack did make some further recordings in the '70s, including arguably some of his best for his fine tribute album to Jimmie Rodgers. He moved to Nashville and in 1976, recorded an album that found release in the UK (where he had toured that year) on the Look label. He worked in publishing for Daily and Lefty Frizzell and in an executive role for the Nashville Song- writers Association until his death from cirrhosis in 1978. A fine honky tonk performer, somewhat in the style of Hank Williams, he is perhaps more appreciated today as a singer than he was in his own time.

 
These pages were saved from "This Is My Story" for reference usage only. Please note that these pages were not originally published or written by BlackCat Rockabilly Europe. For comments or information please contact Dik de Heer at dik.de.heer@hetnet.nl

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